National Geographic Live: Steve Winter
Speaker Series | Photographer | Big Cats

STEVE WINTER

ON THE TRAIL OF BIG CATS

From trekking India’s Himalayas in search of rare snow leopards and stalking the elusive jaguar through Latin American jungles to chronicling the nocturnal activities of the “American lion” or cougar, award-winning photographer Steve Winter ventures far and wide to come face-to-face with his subjects. This is no easy task: many big cat species are in danger of extinction, so they have good reason to avoid humans.

Endangered, wild, and unpredictable, caution is required in the presence of these felines, and negotiating their habitats can be dangerous. Winter has been charged by rhinos and stuck in quicksand. He’s had mishaps with remote-controlled cameras and captured more than his share of hikers with his camera trap on a Southern California hillside before catching his memorable shot of a cougar under the iconic “Hollywood” sign. Throughout it all, Winter’s mission is to share the beauty of big cats and work to save them.

 

STEVE WINTER

Steve Winter has been stalked by jaguars in Brazil, charged by a grizzly in Siberia, and trapped in quicksand in the world's largest tiger reserve in Myanmar. He's flown over erupting volcanoes and visited isolated villages where residents had never before seen a blond foreigner—or a camera.

Growing up in Indiana, Winter dreamed of traveling the world as a photographer for National Geographic. His first camera was a gift from his father on his seventh birthday. Over the next few years, Winter's dad taught him the basics of photography.

After graduating from the Academy of Art and the University of San Francisco, Winter signed on as a photojournalist for Black Star Photo Agency. Since then, he has produced stories for National Geographic, GEO, Time, Newsweek, Fortune, Audubon, Smithsonian, Scientific American, and Stern. His nonprofit and commercial clients include African Parks, Wildlife Conservation Society, Panthera, UNICEF, and Merck Pharmaceuticals.

In 1991, Winter began shooting for National Geographic. Among the many subjects he has covered for National Geographic magazine are including life along Myanmar’s Irrawaddy River, captive tigers in the United States, the nature of Cuba, and, of course, big cats—including jaguars, snow leopards, tigers, cougars, and leopards. He has worked on three shows on big cats for Nat Geo WILD and published the National Geographic book Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cat.

Winter lives with his wife, two dogs, and a not-so-big cat named Punky in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Photo by Steve Winter 

Photo by Steve Winter

Photo by Steve Winter

Local Sponsors

Martha Locke

For sponsorship inquiries, contact Alex Haley. 

Date

Tue, Oct 4th

Time

7:30 PM - Showtime
7:00 PM - Doors Open

Price Range

$24 | $29 | $34

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National Geographic Live: Steve Winter
Date
Tue, Oct 4th
Time
7:30 PM - Showtime
7:00 PM - Doors Open
Price Range
$24 | $29 | $34
Speaker Series | Photographer | Big Cats

STEVE WINTER

ON THE TRAIL OF BIG CATS

From trekking India’s Himalayas in search of rare snow leopards and stalking the elusive jaguar through Latin American jungles to chronicling the nocturnal activities of the “American lion” or cougar, award-winning photographer Steve Winter ventures far and wide to come face-to-face with his subjects. This is no easy task: many big cat species are in danger of extinction, so they have good reason to avoid humans.

Endangered, wild, and unpredictable, caution is required in the presence of these felines, and negotiating their habitats can be dangerous. Winter has been charged by rhinos and stuck in quicksand. He’s had mishaps with remote-controlled cameras and captured more than his share of hikers with his camera trap on a Southern California hillside before catching his memorable shot of a cougar under the iconic “Hollywood” sign. Throughout it all, Winter’s mission is to share the beauty of big cats and work to save them.

 

STEVE WINTER

Steve Winter has been stalked by jaguars in Brazil, charged by a grizzly in Siberia, and trapped in quicksand in the world's largest tiger reserve in Myanmar. He's flown over erupting volcanoes and visited isolated villages where residents had never before seen a blond foreigner—or a camera.

Growing up in Indiana, Winter dreamed of traveling the world as a photographer for National Geographic. His first camera was a gift from his father on his seventh birthday. Over the next few years, Winter's dad taught him the basics of photography.

After graduating from the Academy of Art and the University of San Francisco, Winter signed on as a photojournalist for Black Star Photo Agency. Since then, he has produced stories for National Geographic, GEO, Time, Newsweek, Fortune, Audubon, Smithsonian, Scientific American, and Stern. His nonprofit and commercial clients include African Parks, Wildlife Conservation Society, Panthera, UNICEF, and Merck Pharmaceuticals.

In 1991, Winter began shooting for National Geographic. Among the many subjects he has covered for National Geographic magazine are including life along Myanmar’s Irrawaddy River, captive tigers in the United States, the nature of Cuba, and, of course, big cats—including jaguars, snow leopards, tigers, cougars, and leopards. He has worked on three shows on big cats for Nat Geo WILD and published the National Geographic book Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cat.

Winter lives with his wife, two dogs, and a not-so-big cat named Punky in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Photo by Steve Winter 

Photo by Steve Winter

Photo by Steve Winter

Local Sponsors

Martha Locke

For sponsorship inquiries, contact Alex Haley. 

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